Tha An Cèic Thuit (Bho Bheurla gu Gàidhlig na h-Alba)

Tha An Cèic Thuit

Mo cèic cha’n urrainn èiridh suas
ann an neoil nan aoibhneas agus duslach
mura dèan thu sin crathaidh
min, fhàidheanta
mo ìm pan-steach.

Chan eil tuilleadh ìm air mo tòst
a thogail ann an deoch-slàinte
bho thu, mo leannan; thu
a ghabh mu dheireadh maide reòta ìm.

Thu, mo boireannach, dh’fhag mi
leis an doras brag de ruaig soufflé.
———-
The Cake Fell

My cake can not rise
in clouds of dust and joy
if you do not sprinkle
flour, mystic
my butter in pan.

No more butter on my toast
built in a toast
from you, my love; you
took the last stick frozen butter.

You, my woman left me
with the door shut defeat of soufflé.

— Douglas Gilbert

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3 thoughts on “Tha An Cèic Thuit (Bho Bheurla gu Gàidhlig na h-Alba)

    1. Thanks. It’s weird but I keep having to stick in extra words to get the translations to refer to the right person or thing. It seems easy enough in English to be succinct and know exactly who and what is referred to. In some of the languages I’ve found out that “his” and “her” are worthless because it refers to the gender of the inanimate object and not to the person who possesses it. That’s just weird: it’s more important that an apple or a stone are male or female rather than whether the person is male or female. I didn’t realize that so I kept saying things like “She picked up her stone” and it was translated into “She picked up his stone,” if the stone was a He. Yikes, that was confusing. So basically, I guess it’s “She picked up the stone who is a male thing, and nobody cares if it belongs to her.” I guess the translation programs don’t know what we do in English. They should see “his or her” and do whatever is appropriate in the other language — I’m still not sure what they do: ?That stone of hers can be a male thing when he steals it from her and throws it. With my luck that will translate into “His stone of him can be the thingy when she steals it from herself and throws him.” I have no idea what’s going on.

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